Category Archives: Books

Zend Framework Free Book : Surviving The Deep End

Hey folks,
today Padriac Brady has released a new Zend Framework Book,

About the author :
http://www.survivethedeepend.com/zendframeworkbook/en/1.0/introduction#zfbook.introduction.me

To read the book :

http://www.survivethedeepend.com/zendframeworkbook/en/1.0

About the book (quoted from the book):

Zend Framework: Surviving The Deep End is written in the form of a detailed tutorial following a step by step approach to building a real life application. Topics are grouped where it makes sense and there will be continual references to earlier chapters which serves to reinforce what you’re learning as you read. The book was designed to bring together elements of the Reference Guide, the growing body of community knowledge and my own personal experience so developers can see the bigger picture of developing a real application with the Zend Framework.No comments

To my mind that’s always been the framework’s main problem since the Reference Guide adds little beyond explaining each framework component in total isolation. It doesn’t offer a development approach, ways of thinking or a list of advanced topics which combine components. You should note though that this book is not a replacement for the Zend Framework Reference Guide. It’s assumed you can do some independent reading of the Reference Guide. The Guide is free, detailed, and reasonably easy to search. This book is a complement to it, not a replacement.No comments

The book also includes the full source code of the application within the text, and may repeat it several times to highlight new changes I am making. I understand that pages of source code can sometimes be frustrating but it does enforce clarity and I value clarity a great deal. For simplicity the full finalised source code of each chapter is available as a separate internet download.No comments

I will over time refer to several external libraries, other than the Zend Framework, which you are expected to install. These will include PEAR, Blueprint CSS Framework, jQuery, HTMLPurifier and PHPUnit. I know from experience this can be unpopular with some people but I assure you that their installation will be covered in detail and is quite straightforward even for beginners. You should bear in mind a real life application will require numerous external libraries!No comments

Finally, note that this book assumes a basic working knowledge of PHP 5, SQL, and Object Oriented Programming (OOP). These are necessary skills if you intend learning the Zend Framework but will not be covered by this book in detail. Since PHP is so simple to learn though, I don’t doubt you can find countless resources online to get you started down the road towards PHP Guru status.

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enjoy reading 😉

To read the book :

http://www.survivethedeepend.com/zendframeworkbook/en/1.0

How to read chm files on Ubuntu

This can be easily done with install GnoCHM, the CHM viewere for Linux

you can install it by executing this command in the terminal

sudo apt-get install gnochm

enjoy 😉

Linux Terminal Commands Guide

Hey folks,

a friend asked me for a nice guide to learn the Linux commands, so i made a search for him and found some cool links

straight to the point guide for beginners :
http://linux.org.mt/article/terminal

it covers the following topics :
* Introduction
* Preparation
* The “Bash” shell
* A simple command
* Obtaining help
* Linux Directories
* Linux Files
* Wildcards
* Typing Tricks
* Redirecting Output
* Environment variables
* Scripts
* Aliases
* Switching to root
* Compiling from source
* Conclusion

————————————————–
Alphabetical Directory of Linux Commands
http://www.oreillynet.com/linux/cmd/

a complete directory of Linux commands

————————————————–
Linux shortcuts and commands
http://www.unixguide.net/linux/linuxshortcuts.shtml

This is a practical selection of the commands we use most often

if you have more cool guides, please post in comments

Architectural principles

  1. Each project must have a clear customer and deliver a real benefit.
  2. Don’t Repeat Yourself (DRY). Life is too short to spend your time re-inventing things.
  3. Be as simple as possible. Just do what we need to do now.
  4. Be as open as possible. Assume that all services can be accessed from outside the BBC, by default.
  5. Start simple, then iterate. Build the smallest thing you could possibly need, deploy it, then build applications on top of it. Think building blocks, not monoliths.
  6. Don’t optimise prematurely. The service might not grow the way we think it will.
  7. Build to scale. Think stateless, think content delivery networks, think database resilience.
  8. Test often. So you know when you need to optimise. So you can maintain your code. So you can maintain your platform.
  9. Evolve. Teams, systems, support structures. The platform. These principles!
  10. Let it die. Be prepared to turn your system off, or change it unrecognisably.

The Seven ‘Lies’ Of Success


1. Everything happens for a reason and a purpose, and it serves us
2. There is no such thing as failure. There are only results
3. Whatever happens, take responsibility
4. It’s not necessary to understand everything to be able to use everything
5. People are your greatest resource
6. Work is play
7. There is no abiding success without commitment

Quoted from Unlimited Power for Tony Robinson.

What i am reading now – HTML Dog: The Book

HTML Dog: The Best Practice Guide to XHTML and CSS, published by New Riders, has recently hit the shelves!

HTML Dog book coverWith best practices (using web standards) at its heart, it outlines how to do things the right way from the outset to produce highly optimized web pages, in a quicker, easier, less painful way than you might think.

The book builds on and complements the HTML Dog website and applies the same concise, easily digestible, straight-talking, engaging style to achieve the same ultimate goal: to help the reader come to grips with XHTML and CSS and successfully use them in the best possible way.

What’s In It

Split into 10 easy-to-follow chapters such as Text, Images, Layout, Lists, and Forms, and coupled with handy quick-reference XHTML tag and CSS property appendixes, HTML Dog is the perfect guide and companion for anyone wanting who wants to learn about:

  • In-depth XHTML: Learn about all of the valid tags and attributes.
  • Comprehensive CSS: Explore all of the valid selectors, properties, and values.
  • Web Standards: Discover how separating content (using HTML) from presentation (using CSS) can lead to lightweight, easily manageable, reliable web pages.
  • Cutting-edge techniques: Leap beyond the old-school days of font tags, table layouts, and frames.
  • Accessibility: Exploit the mechanisms in HTML designed explicitly to make your pages more user friendly to more people.
  • Cross-compatibility: Make your web pages not only cross-browser compatible, but optimized for screen readers, mobile web devices, and print.
  • Practical demonstrations: See the lessons in action in 70+ “bare bone” online examples constructed especially for the book.

Who It’s For

This book is for those who want to get to grips with best-practice (X)HTML and CSS, and for those who want a solid, reliable reference book.

For novices it details all of the essential bits and pieces to get started (and progress towards a professional standard). For those who want to sharpen up their existing (possibly rusty) skills, it comprehensively lays bare the latest web standards approaches to HTML and CSS. There’s even value for more experienced developers – we all need a trusty reference!

The Author

Patrick GriffithsPatrick Griffiths has been an HTML specialist since 1999. Not a designer nor a programmer, but a front-end developer, with XHTML and CSS his trusty weapons of choice. He has worked in this specific capacity for, among others, Vodafone, Wiley, educational establishments, and on various government projects, and more recently as a developer and instructor for his own company, Vivabit, through which he has provided training for organizations such as Amnesty International, Legal & General, and London’s Natural History Museum.

In addition to writing and maintaining the HTML Dog web site, he has contributed to resources such as A List Apart and the CSS Zen Garden, and is an active, well renowned member of the web design community.